2019-2020 Catalog 
    
    Sep 17, 2019  
2019-2020 Catalog

Department of Social Work and Criminal Justice


Faculty

RACHEL GUIMOND (2010)
  Associate Professor of Social Work; Chair, Department of Social Work and Criminal Justice
B.A., 2002, Point Loma Nazarene University
A.M., 2004, University of Chicago
D.S.W., 2015, University of Tennessee

BARRY LEE (2008)
  Professor of Social Work
B.A., 1982, Coe College
M.S.W., 1993, University of Illinois at Chicago
Psy.D., 2013, Adler School of Professional Psychology

HILLARY COLE (2015)
  Assistant Professor of Social Work; Program Director
B.S.W., 2009, Olivet Nazarene University
M.S.W., 2010, Dominican University

DENISE ANDERSON (2016)
  Professor of Social Work
B.S.W., 1988, Shippensburg University
M.S.W., 1989, Temple University
Ph.D., 1995, University of Maryland
M.A.P.M., 2013, Northwest Nazarene University

CRAIG BISHOP (2011)
  Professor of Criminal Justice
B.S., 1985, Illinois State University
M.O.L., 2008, Olivet Nazarene University
Ed.D., 2013, Olivet Nazarene University

REBECCA STROUD (2013)
  Associate Professor of Criminal Justice
B.A., 1990, Olivet Nazarene University
M.A., 2013, Governors State University
Ph.D., 2018, Capella University

MATTHEW ADAMSON (2015)
 
Assistant Professor of Criminal Justice
B.S., 2013, Kaplan University
M.P.A., 2015, Kaplan University

Affiliate Faculty

NICK PACHOLSKI (2018)
  Social Work Field Placement Coordinator
B.S.W., 2011, Olivet Nazarene University
M.S.W., 2009, Governor State University


The Department of Social Work and Criminal Justice operates within the School of Life and Health Sciences. Its mission is to prepare students for a life of service to others through God’s call into the social work and criminal justice fields. The department offers two distinct majors: social work and criminal justice. Students may also choose a minor in either of these fields. Criminal Justice majors may choose a concentration in Law Enforcement.

Social Work

The Social Work major consists of 50 credit hours of core social work courses, plus 13 hours of required supporting course work. Students are prepared for generalist social work practice, placing emphasis on developing foundational social work skills that are needed in a wide variety of professional social work environments. Utilizing the ecological and strengths-based perspectives, students learn about social work with individuals, families, groups, organizations, and communities.

The degree conferred upon successful completion of all requirements is a Bachelor of Social Work (BSW). The BSW degree prepares students for professional employment in a variety of social work settings as well as for advanced standing admission to many Master of Social Work (MSW) programs. The social work program is accredited by the Council on Social Work Education (CSWE).

Social Work Core Competencies

Social work majors are required to demonstrate mastery of the following core competencies prescribed by the Council on Social Work Education:

  1. Demonstrate ethical and professional behavior.
  2. Engage diversity and difference in practice.
  3. Advance human rights and social, economic and environmental justice.
  4. Engage in practice-informed research and research-informed practice.
  5. Engage in policy practice.
  6. Engage with individuals, families, groups, organizations and communities.
  7. Assess individuals, families, groups, organizations and communities.
  8. Intervene with individuals, families, groups, organizations and communities.
  9. Evaluate practice with individuals, families, groups, organizations and communities.

Social Work Program Admittance

Any student may ‘declare’ social work as a major at any time during his or her academic undergraduate study. However, declaring the major does not automatically ensure a student will graduate with the BSW degree. To be considered a candidate for the BSW degree, a student must be formally admitted to the major program.

To be considered for formal admittance a student must have the following:

  1. Completion of the following courses with a C- or higher grade:
  2. Cumulative GPA of 2.50 or higher
  3. Completion of one 20-hour block of applied learning in addition to that required in SOWK 200  

Students who have met the above criteria may request an application packet and schedule an interview. Following the interview, the social work faculty will make a determination on formal admittance into the BSW program. The student will be notified in writing of this determination.

At the discretion of the social work faculty, a student may be admitted into the program ‘conditionally.’ This may occur when a student needs to improve his or her GPA, repeat a course, modify attitude or behavior, or another reason deemed appropriate. When this occurs, the student will either be notified in writing with the reason for conditional status or a meeting will be conducted with the student to explain the conditional status.

During preregistration each semester, students on conditional status must provide an update to his/her academic adviser on the issues related to the conditional status.

Students must formally be admitted into the Social Work program to enroll in the following:

For reasons outlined in the Social Work Handbook, a student’s admission may be revoked. A student whose admission into the program has been revoked must wait one full academic year before reapplying for readmission. The application for readmittance is the same as the initial application process.

The Social Work program reserves the right to schedule a meeting for any reason at any time with any student admitted into the program to discuss his/her progress and pursuit of the social work profession.

Social Work Applied Learning

To gain understanding of, appreciation for, and experience in working with diverse clients in community-based human services, social work majors must complete 90 clock-hours of applied (or service) learning. Students complete 30 clock-hours during SOWK 200  or SOWK 202 . An additional 60 clock-hours must be completed as outlined below.

  1. Independent applied learning hours can begin after a student has completed the applied learning orientation in SOWK 200  or SOWK 202 .
  2. Hours may be completed during a semester, summer, or break; the hours may occur around Olivet, the student’s home, or another community (including international volunteer service).
  3. The 60-clock hours of applied learning must be divided into three separate applied learning experiences with three different demographics in three different agencies (20 hours each). Approved demographics include children’s services, youth services, adult services, aging services, services for individuals (any age level) with disability, advocacy and policy services, organizational or community outreach, or formal training in areas related to social work.
  4. All applied learning (except SOWK 200  and SOWK 202 ) must be approved by the student’s academic adviser. Completion of applied learning must be officially documented using the Applied Learning Verification Form and signed by the agency supervisor where the applied learning occurs. This documentation must be submitted to the academic adviser who will approve it and sign it. Applied Learning Verification forms should be uploaded into Taskstream/Watermark. If the student’s academic adviser is not a social work faculty member, the social work program director should give written approval for the applied learning.
  5. Generally speaking, volunteering at church, church camps, regular study abroad activities, campus clubs and activities are not approved applied learning. Mission trips, MIA and campus club activities must be pre-approved by a Faculty Advisor to ensure Social Work appropriate activities will occur.  One ONU ministry can be used for applied learning (as long as the hours can be verified by a ministry leader who is not a current ONU student).  Ministries considered acceptable for applied learning will be determined by the student’s advisor and must include direct contact with at-risk clients.  Job shadowing and positions for which pay is received are not considered applied learning.
  6. Service experiences must include a significant learning experience. For example, distributing food at a food pantry is not adequate; doing intake assessments for eligibility of food distribution at the pantry is acceptable.
  7. Trainings must be formal in nature and include certification or documentation.
  8. Once a student completes an applied learning experience (including all applied learning completed during SOWK 200  and SOWK 202 ) two things must happen for students who interviewed into the program prior to the 2017-2018 academic year: 1.) The student goes online and completes a form to record the applied learning. This form is found on the department page of the “My.Olivet” portal. 2.) The student must complete an Applied Learning Verification Form and have it signed by the supervisor at the site where the applied learning occurred. This form is found on the department page of the “My.Olivet” portal. (The agency may submit documentation on letterhead in lieu of this form.) This verification must be given to the student’s academic advisor to obtain a signature.  Applied Learning Verification forms should then be uploaded into Taskstream/Watermark.
  9. To be eligible to enter field placement, students must have a minimum of 90 clock hours documented and verified.
  10. Students may have the applied learning hours recorded on a co-curricular transcript for future documentation to graduate programs and employers.

Attendance at Social Worker’s Advancement Trainings (SWATs)

To assist students in identifying as a professional social worker who engages in life-long learning, every student must complete Social Worker’s Advancement Training (SWAT) workshops over the course of study prior to entering field placement. At least one workshop will be offered each semester and available for students to attend. SWAT certificates should be uploaded into Taskstream/Watermark.

Attendance at Advocacy Day

All students must attend one National Association of Social Worker’s Advocacy Day event.  This should be attended in a student’s final spring semester prior to field placement.  Students will be contacted for a coordinated enrollment. Participation in Advocacy Day should be confirmed in Taskstream/Watermark.

Attendance at CEU Event

All students must attend a Continuing Education Event. The Social Work Program offers an event each spring semester that students in their final spring semester prior to field placement are invited to attend.  Students will be contacted for a coordinated enrollment.  If a student fails to attend this event, he/she must make individual arrangements to attend a community CEU event and document attendance with his/her adviser.  CEU attendance certificates should be uploaded into Taskstream/Watermark.

Social Work Field Placement

All social work majors must successfully complete a 450-clock-hour field placement as the culminating experience of their education. During this placement, students must demonstrate mastery of all core competencies.

To be eligible to enroll in SOWK 400 - Field Placement   and SOWK 405 - Social Work Field Seminar II  , students must have the following:

  1. Cumulative GPA of 2.50 or higher
  2. All final grades for major courses, supporting courses, and social work elective courses must be C- or higher
  3. All social work competency assessment scores must be 70% or higher (based on specific assignments for social work courses). For students who have a competency score(s) below 70%, the remediation process must be successfully completed before entering field placement.
  4. Completion of applied learning:
    • 30 clock-hours during SOWK 200  or SOWK 202  
    • 60 clock-hours–three learning experiences in differing practice settings of 20 clock-hours each
  5. Students with conditional status must schedule an interview with social work faculty during the semester preceding the student’s field placement to determine readiness for the field placement experience.

A criminal background check may be required as a prerequisite for a student beginning field placement. This criminal background check will be at the expense of the student or the agency requiring a criminal background check.

The Social Work program reserves the right to deny enrollment in SOWK 400 - Field Placement  and SOWK 405 - Social Work Field Seminar II  to any student that the Social Work faculty determines unprepared to enter field placement.

Criminal Justice

The Criminal Justice major consists of 31 hours of core coursework, plus 9 hours of required supporting courses. The major balances theoretical concepts with practical experience. Students will be exposed to a variety of community, legal and police environments. The program is excellent preparation for careers in law enforcement, probation, the courts, and corrections. Students who successfully complete the criminal justice major will receive the Bachelor of Science (BS) degree.

Criminal Justice - Law Enforcement Concentration

Criminal justice majors have the option of adding a concentration in Law Enforcement. This concentration requires additional courses, participation in Military Science Leadership classes, and an ability to pass the “Power Test” (physical readiness). The concentration includes 31 academic hours of core Criminal Justice courses plus 39 academic hours of required supporting courses.

To be eligible for the concentration students must:

  • Maintain a cumulative GPA of 2.50 or higher
  • All final grades for major and supporting courses must be C- or higher
  • All criminal justice competency assessment scores are assessed. Students with competency scores below 70% will be reviewed by faculty for permission to continue.
  • During the concentration, students will be required to obtain a Firearm Owners Identification (FOID) card at the student’s expense. This concentration requires students to pay a Field Fee of $450.00 upon enrolling in course CJUS 450 - Fundamentals of Police Training . Additional certificate opportunities may be made available to students in the concentration.

Students completing this concentration must do their field placement with a law enforcement agency or similar entity approved by the Criminal Justice Program Director.

Criminal Justice Core Competencies

Criminal Justice majors are required to demonstrate mastery of the following core competencies:

  1. Administration of Justice: Students must demonstrate competence in the administration of justice and in systems of social control, policy, and practices. Emphasis is placed on the student’s application of understanding of fairness, justice, ethical values, and support of diversity in the absence of prejudice. Practice behaviors include: The student demonstrates understanding of the systems, societal control, policy, criminal theory, and law adjudication within the Criminal Justice agency. The student demonstrates understanding of the administration of justice in law enforcement. The student demonstrates understanding of the administration of justice in correctional processes. The student demonstrates understanding of the administration of justice in the juvenile justice system.
  2. Critical Thinking and Reasoning Skills: Students must demonstrate the ability to think critically, orally articulate, and logically justify thought processes and actions in the administration of justice. Practice behaviors include: The student demonstrates critical thinking skills and logically justifies his/her thoughts and actions in the administration of justice. The student demonstrates the ability to complete the required actions to achieve problem solving in a professional manner.
  3. Professionalism: Students have an obligation to conduct themselves in a manner that demonstrates the qualities of a professional within the Criminal Justice System. Practice behaviors include: The student maintains legal and professional behavior, demonstrates a willingness to be mentored, and engages in effective interpersonal relationships. The student demonstrates integrity and practices personal and professional ethics. The student demonstrates the ability to meet professional expectations in his/her oral and written communications. The student practices an understanding of and appreciation for diversity. The student demonstrates commitment to fairness and equality.
  4. Research and Analytical Methods: Students must demonstrate an understanding of meaningful research and the methods used for analyzing data in order to create and institute justice policy. Practice behaviors include: The student uses meaningful research and analysis to understand the administration of justice and inform decision-making.

Criminal Justice Field Placement

All criminal justice majors must successfully complete a 270-clock-hour field placement (CJUS 400 ) in the final year of academic study. During this placement, students must demonstrate mastery of all core competencies.

To be eligible to enroll in CJUS 400 - Field Placement I  students must have a minimum cumulative GPA of 2.0 and have competency assessment scores of 70% or higher (based on specific assignments for criminal justice courses). Students whose competency assessment scores are less than 70% may be asked to meet with the Criminal Justice faculty and develop a plan of action for demonstrating mastery of the competencies.

Students are eligible to enroll in an additional field placement up to 270 clock-hours to further develop skills and gain practical experience. This additional field placement may be completed in a different setting than the first field placement.

A criminal background check may be required as a prerequisite for a student beginning field placement. This criminal background check will be at the expense of the student or the agency requiring the criminal background check.

The Criminal Justice program reserves the right to deny enrollment in CJUS 400 - Field Placement I  to any student that the Criminal Justice faculty determines unprepared to enter field placement.

Programs

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